Monday, 25 August 2014

Haematite vein from Eas an Fholaich, near Loch Eilt, west of Fort William

Part of a haematite vein from Eas an Fholaich, near Loch Eilt, west of Fort William, Invernessshire. Haematite is an iron ore mineral composed of iron oxide. It belongs to the hexagonal crystal system and can occur as stubby black rhombohedral crystals or more commonly massive, granular masses, compact, or soft and earthy. It has a dark cherry streak. British Geological Survey Petrology Collection sample number MC 7446. There is evidence that haematite in veins has been known in Scotland from a very early date. In the middle of the 18th century haematite was mined at Tomintoul, Pennel Burn in Ayrshire and at Garleton in East Lothian. Iron ores come in many forms from bog iron ores, sedimentary bedded ores, to ore deposits injected as metalliferous intrusions. Haematite is often in the latter category.
BGS Imager ID: P527666

Part of a haematite vein from Eas an Fholaich, near Loch Eilt, west of Fort William, Invernessshire. British Geological Survey Petrology Collection sample number MC 7446. 

Haematite is an iron ore mineral composed of iron oxide. It belongs to the hexagonal crystal system and can occur as stubby black rhombohedral crystals or more commonly massive, granular masses, compact, or soft and earthy. It has a dark cherry streak. There is evidence that haematite in veins has been known in Scotland from a very early date. In the middle of the 18th century haematite was mined at Tomintoul, Pennel Burn in Ayrshire and at Garleton in East Lothian. Iron ores come in many forms from bog iron ores, sedimentary bedded ores, to ore deposits injected as metalliferous intrusions. Haematite is often in the latter category.

Posted by Bob McIntosh

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